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The Fort Nelson First Nation was left with no choice but to drum the Province of BC out of the gathering with an honour song at the First Nation Shale Gas LNG Summit held on April 16, 2014. It was in response to a regulation change that was passed without public debate or first nation consultation to allow natural gas processing plants that produce "sweet gas" to no longer face the environmental assessment as of April 28.

The Fort Nelson First Nation was left with no choice but to drum the Province of BC out of the gathering with an honour song at the First Nation Shale Gas LNG Summit held on April 16, 2014. It was in response to a regulation change that was passed without public debate or first nation consultation to allow natural gas processing plants that produce "sweet gas" to no longer face the environmental assessment as of April 28.

Fort Nelson LNG msg

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Chief Sharleen Gale: first Public statement as a result of yesterdays announcement by the Christy Clark Government, removing LNG Plants from Environmental Screening

Chief Sharleen Gale Ft Nelson First nation asks the Province of BC to leave the LNG Forum and also asks Industry to do the same in Ft Nelson.

This is in response to Christy Clark government announcement of removing LNG Plants from Environmental Screening process all the while they say they seek a new relationship with First nations based on respect and mutual goals.

Not out your one face but out the other....

A First Nation band is reviving the age-old practice of controlled burning in order to improve the health of forests and restore the population of the wood bison in a corner of northeastern B.C.

“Fire, used properly, is a friend, not an enemy,” says Rose Loe, an elder in the Fort Nelson First Nation, which is composed of Dene and Cree people near the Yukon border.

'Fire, used properly, is a friend, not an enemy.'— Rose Loe, elder in the Fort Nelson First Nation

By NATHAN VANDERKLIPPE

The province has likened the industry's revenue potential to that of the oil sands – but critics fear the environmental costs

Billions of litres of water a year. Thousands of expensive wells. New roads. Many hectares of trees felled and land cleared. Camps to house thousands of workers.

In November 2012, Fort Nelson First Nation Chief and Council and a delegation went to Vancouver to discuss their concerns about the Province’s intention to issue 20 long-term licenses for shale gas extraction in their territory. Fort Nelson First Nation held a Shale Gas & Water Town Hall Session on January 15th to clarify their position.

Here is our video summary from the three hour Shale Gas and Water Town Hall Session held on January 15, 2013.

To watch the full length version of this please go to Youtube Fort Nelson Online or click on:

Billions of litres of water a year. Thousands of expensive wells. New roads. Many hectares of trees felled and land cleared. Camps to house thousands of workers.

At the same time, the West Coast export of Canadian natural gas carries the promise of so many billions in new revenues that its government has taken to comparing it with Alberta’s oil sands. Some of the final regulatory obstacles to large-scale gas exports have been settled, and recently a small project called BC LNG said it had signed gas sales agreements that could allow it to start construction soon.

A delegation of First Nations people traveled from northern British Columbia to Vancouver this week.

Their goal was to raise the alarm about what they call the government’s mission to allow industry to destroy fresh water streams.

The mission would see the extraction of billions of litres of water from lakes and rivers.

APTN National News reporter Tina House explains.

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